Conventional machining



Conventional machining

The word ‘machining’ and the phrase ‘conventional machining’ have changed over time. This is natural. After all, machining is connected to engineering and technology, and these are fields that change quickly, so it is no great surprise that conventional machining will have taken on a different meaning over time.
In the late 1700s, the word ‘machinist’ began to be used to refer to the practice of working with machines. A machinist was therefore the person who did any work that involved building or repairing machines. This was originally a job required in the mills and early factories of northern England. Over time, the use and range of machines spread to include transport, mining, farming and other industries, as well as being a job that was in demand across the whole of the United Kingdom and Europe.
By the mid-1800s, the word ‘machining’ had come into use to describe the work of a machinist. Machining described all the processes that were needed to make and repair machines. This included working with metal and wood, and a wide role of processes such as drilling, boring, milling, shaping, planning and tapping. As machines took on an increasingly large role in industry, machining became an important role within industry.
By the mid-twentieth century, the idea of machining and the words used were changing again. New technologies were changing the face of engineering and included new methods such as ultrasonic technologies which did not quite fit with the traditional idea of machining. Over time, the concepts of ‘conventional machining’ and ‘unconventional machining’ came into use.
Conventional machining became the phrase to refer to the more traditional methods of machine work. In simple terms, conventional machining involves methods of machining which involve the use of a physical tool which is harder than the material being worked. Contact between the tool and the material is used to create the shape or form of part that is required. Examples of conventional machining include drilling holes, using a lathe and sharp cutting tool, milling machines and drill presses. The alternative to conventional machining, unconventional machining, involves methods of machining which do not involve direct contact between the tool and the material, such as photochemical machining, electron beam machining and ultrasonic machining.
Conventional machining is fundamental to many of the machining processes in industry in modern Britain. The leading expert in conventional machining is RKD Machine Shop Services. This company has extensive experience in a wide range of conventional machining methods and a wide range of materials. They are available for the conventional machining of bespoke components and parts, modifications to existing parts and the construction of prototypes and scale models.
If you need the best service in conventional machining, look no further than RKD Machine Shop Services. They have an excellent track record, as you can see by visiting the website to read about them, including the testimonials from satisfied customers and the gallery of past projects which used conventional machining methods. For more information, including all enquiries about conventional machining, contact RDK Machine Shop Services today.